Reliability

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Reliability

Postby Ian Linden » Mon May 22, 2017 22:41

Had my Cappo now for 17 years and just had to change a part due to failure. As far as I can recall, this is only the second time such a thing has occurred. The first was a small cooling hose, which I replaced with some fuel hose I had. This time it was a trafficator bulb.

Mean Time Between Failures (MTBF) 8.5 years. I call that pretty good!
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Re: Reliability

Postby Murray Betts » Tue May 23, 2017 00:22

Thin end of the wedge Ian. You'll be telling us you had to pump the tyres up next. What are these cars like, eh?

Mine is very low mileage, but having had it since early 1996 (dealer registered but otherwise first owner), I've only had to replace service items (cambelt once), but did have the dash warning lamps for the indicator and something else (forget what) stop working due to tarnished contacts. That's about it. :D
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Re: Reliability

Postby Kevin Sullivan » Fri Mar 09, 2018 03:53

Just passed my 2yr "Sha-ke-n" (Japanese car inspection/MOT) today. Needed a new battery. Recommendation was the headlamps are weak, the reflectors need cleaning, and an LED H3 replacement (from Amazon) was a good idea.

Overall reliability has been outstanding, no big issues. Did need to replace the electric power window switch in the center console 3 years ago, and rear differential bushings 4 years ago. The turbo@100k kilometers was a bit worn and weak, my solution was an engine swap with a crashed Cappu with under 50k on it and a fresh(er) turbo, with a new clutch and cam belt and any worn seals while all was apart for the swap. Not counting brake pads and fresh tires.

From stock Cordoba Red 1992 EA11R, a few modifications and upgrades along the way:
-Stainless Steel brake lines (firmer pedal than old rubber)
-15" rims (and original 14" with summer tires, and 14" with snow tires)
-Engine:
--Monster Sport N1 ECU Kit (one step colder spark plugs and a re-flashed ECU that advances timing, better/extended fuel maps for up to 1.2bar boost), removes the 140k/83mph electronic speed limiter)
--Electronic Boost Controller (I keep at 1bar, no desire to risk the head gasket, though a metal one is available...)
--Intake - K&N low-restriction air intake, and modified air filter box for an extra 2" intake tube
--Exhaust: full 2"/52mm stainless steel (catalytic converter mid-pipe + stainless dual exhausts)
-Interior:
--Boost gauge (to 1.5bar)
--Momo red/black leather steering wheel and gear shift knob
--red LED backlit instrument gauges
--Bluetooth stereo
-Exterior
--fresh paint, stock red.

In all, a happy spunky car. A few more upgrades and I would call it done for me:

-Interior: Black leather seats & door cards

-Handling: Under hard cornering, the inside rear tire can lift, and fuel starvation at the pump pickup if fuel is low. I would like a Cusco LSD 1.5-way to keep delivering power, and perhaps a baffled fuel tank. However, as the car is currently used as a Sunday driver and rarely hits the switchbacks and mountain passes I find it hard to justify the cost {were my wallet fatter, no problem...}
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Re: Reliability

Postby Ian Linden » Fri Mar 09, 2018 08:56

I have found that the thing which makes turbos go weak is a fatigued spring in the boost controller. Rather than haul the engine out to replace it (I think it's impossible to do in situ) I fitted a pneumatic system to the boost hose sampler, cobbled together from three valves, two of which are adjustable.

...by following the advice in the 2-part article at http://www.autospeed.com/cms/article.html?&A=0670 and http://www.autospeed.com/cms/article.html?&A=0685&P=1. This scheme uses two relatively inexpensive pneumatic valves (see http://www.suzuki-cappuccino.com/albumviewer/viewalbum.php?dev=1&a=42) , and the setting up is well explained. It eliminates turbo lag and "waste gate creep" - not explained here - read the article. It works very well in a Cappuccino, and allows you to eliminate low boost caused by a fatigued actuator spring.
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